Free Courses for Genealogy Research Success

Frugal Finds

I have raised 3 kids. Well 2 and a half… one is still floating around the nest for a few more years. One thing raising kids taught me was how to be frugal. I’m annoyingly cheap. That carries over into my genealogy. I splurge on my ancestry account, but mostly I spend my genealogy dollars carefully.

I take advantage of a lot of free research resources. I have a list of sites I rely on to provide me with research information that might be harder to find on bigger sites. I also take advantage of a lot of free courses. The Internet is full of free genealogy courses, webinars, videos, and how to articles. Sometimes the trick is knowing where to look to find the best resources among the vast noise out there.

books and glasses
Photo by Pixabay on Pexels.com

Future Learn

Right now I am taking the Genealogy: Researching Your Family Tree course on Future Learn. The course is 6 weeks long, taught by instructors at the University of Strathclyde Glasgow, and offered free on the Future Learn open course platform. I am about to start week 5 of the series, and I cannot say how much I have enjoyed the course. It is great for beginners, but even experienced researchers will get great information. There are quite a few other courses on Future Learn that could interest researchers.

Evidence Explained

The National Genealogical Society offers a certificate in American Genealogical Studies. The certificate course comprises 4 classes that teach different aspects of genealogical research. The classes are a great value but out of my budget, so I looked at what I could find about the course that might be helpful. The required materials for the second two classes of the program include a book called Evidence Explained: Citing History Sources from Artifacts to Cyberspace by Elizabeth Shown Mills.

Elizabeth Shown Mills is a fellow of the American Society of Genealogists. She is an expert in the field and her book is an irreplaceable resource. She has brought some of her knowledge to a series of quick lessons on her site Evidence Explained.  On her site, she provides 26 quick lessons that provide in-depth explanations of evidence and how to understand what it means.

There is a wealth of free learning resources on the Internet. What are some of your favorite free learning finds?

**No plugs just honest opinions. I receive no compensation for this post.**

9 replies »

  1. There are lots of things that are free for genealogy research—FamilySearch.org, Google, many online archives and newspapers, and for me Jewishgen is a great resource also. But Ancestry and various newspaper databases and ordering records makes this overall an expensive hobby.

    Liked by 1 person

  2. What I like is finding clues like a detective.
    I also have fun when I find how wrong I was at first. One example is the old picture of my grandaunt Lillie Lagasse with her husband and two children. In 2009 that was a mystery family, then little by little Lillie was seen on other photos. It had to be her. Then I tried to guess who were the two children. I think I know now.

    Maybe someday someone will prove me wrong.

    At least I would have tried.

    Liked by 1 person

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